1st Edition

The Road Not Taken
A History of Radical Social Work in the United States





ISBN 9780415933995
Published February 1, 2002 by Routledge
290 Pages

USD $49.95

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Book Description

The Road Not Taken takes a new perspective on the course of social welfare policy in the twentieth century. This examination looks at the evolution of social work in the United States as a dynamic process not just driven by mainstream organizations and politics, but strongly influenced by the ideas and experiences of radical individuals and marginalized groups as well.

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1. Social Work: A Radical Profession?
2. Radical Social Work in the Progressive Era
3. The Spider Web Conspiracy and the Death of Progressivism
4. The Rank and File Movement and the Precursors to McCarthyism
5. Anti-Communism and the Attack on the New Deal
6. Social Work Response to McCarthyism
7. The Revival of Radicalism in Social Work
8. The Redefinition of Social Work Radicalism, 1970-1999--Part I
9. The Redefinition of Social Work Radicalism, 1970-1999--Part II
10. Social Work Radicalism at the End of the Twentieth Century
11. Conclusion--The Future of Radical Social Work in the United States
Sources
Index

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Reviews

"In this detailed and thoroughly researched book, Reisch and Andrews trace the history of social work from the perspective of social workers who were (and still are) committed to a radical approach...this book should be essential reading for social workers everywhere. By tracing the history of activist and 'left' social work, the authors make an original and important contribution to the literature. Social work educators who teach the history of social work ought to prescribe this book and ensure that students understand that the Charity Organization Society and the Settlements were not the only pioneers of the social work profession. The book's attempts to recognize the contribution of social work colleagues who, over the years, have thought of themselves as radical, is important and timely." -- Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Vol. 29 no. 4, December 2002