1st Edition

Individual Differences in Children and Adolescents



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ISBN 9781560009818
Published June 30, 1997 by Routledge
341 Pages

USD $50.95

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Book Description

This uniquely authoritative collection of original papers, with contributions from over twenty countries, provides a rare insight into research and applied programs in the study of individual differences in children and adolescents worldwide. While delinquency proves to be one of the most common areas of interest, a wide range of cognitive, personality, and social characteristics are examined, and the use of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire in many studies allows uniform comparisons to be made between countries.

The editors have not only overcome the language barriers which hitherto have made such information virtually inaccessible to the English-speaking world. They have also succeeded in bringing together studies from developed and developing countries, East and West, to present a global picture of adolescent and child psychology. In particular, the book highlights the general and specific cultural influences on child development and adolescent psychology in different countries, and reflects the social and research concerns of the countries and cultures represented.

The authors comprise a cross-section of professionals in the social and behavioral sciences working in university and clinical settings. While North America is well represented by six chapters (including Puerto Rico), as is Europe, particular efforts were made to obtain contributions from Eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa. At the time this book was developed, information exchange with eastern European countries was most difficult. It is very exciting to present chapters from Hungary, Lithuania, Romania, Russia, and Yugoslavia. The inclusion of articles from Japan, Korea, Singapore, Sri landa and Uganda also add another dimension to studies of individual differences in children. Contributions from Australia, Israel, and New Zealand also allow the book to take on much more of an international perspective on topics ranging from delinquency, fears, and motivation to inteligence, personality, and assessment issues. This volume provides a plethora of international perspectives on the study of children. It will be essential to sociologists, psychologists, educators, and child study specialists.